Transmigration of Dexter to Dragonfly
Dexter's Contexture ~ The Array of Threads that Weave
the Fabric of this Vision ~ Homespun by the Darning Need
le

ďA PICKLE FOR THE KNOWING ONES;

or Plain Truths in a Homespun DressĒ

by the late Lord Timothy Dexter

Home ~ 1 ~ Folio 2 ~ 3 ~ 4
View of Folio 2 as "Split Pickle" ~ Original text/Translation

 

Original Text

Lord Dexter depicts the evil results of making Two Towns of One; advises against Office-Seeking and College-Learning.

Friends hear me 2 granadears & goss up in 20 days fourder friends I will tell the A tipe of man kind what is that 35 or 36 years gone A town caled Noubry all won the Younited states15 Noubry people kept to gether quiet till the Larned groed strong the farmers was 12 out of the 20 thay wanted to have the offesers in the Contrey the Larned in the see port wanted to have them there geering A Rose groued worme fite thay wood in Law thay went the Jnrel Cort to be sot of finely thay got there Eands Answered the see port caled Newbury Port 600 Eakers of Land out of thirty thousand Eakers of good Land so much for mad people of Larning makes them mad if thay had kept to gether thay wood have bin the sekent town in this stat A bout halfe of boston Now men mad to be in offess it hurts the peopel at Large Like Carying the Innegent Lam to slarter Now it would doue to dewide the North from the south all won what I have Leade down but Now keep to gether it is Like man and wife in troue Love Now guving death in the grander you will sous the glory I say keep to gether dont brak the Chane Renoue brotherle Love Never fade Like my box in my garding be one grat familey give way to one A Nother thous changes is the tide hie warter & Loue warter hie tids & Loue tids for my part I have Liked all the kings all three all our broken marchants cant have the beaths of proffett goue and till the ground goue to work is all that has bin to Coleage goue with slipers and promis to pay and Never pay only with A Lye I gess 4 fifths is Coleage Lant or devel Lant or pretended to be onnest free mansione but are to the Contry forgive me for gessing I hope it is Not so the Leaned is for Loovs & Littel fishes moses was but a man and Aaron thay had sum devel Like my selfe man is the same give him power I say the Cloak Cukement maters16 the wost of cheats we hant got any N Port wee are Noted to be the first in the North sabed Day is Not half a Nuf Night meatans it maks work for the Docters and Nuses Ceaching Could but them that Lives breed fast to mak up for them that dies poor creaters I pittey them so preast Riden it is wickard to leave poor sols in to the grave all our minstrere are imported Very good men foull of pie house Love I kep them A mit Amen at present.

 

 

 

 

Magnanimity of Lord Dexter.

The yong man that doth most all my Carving his work is much Liked by our grat men I felt founney one day I thort I would ask sade young man whare he was bone he sade Now whare what is all that Now whare was your mother over shaded17 I says my mother was if I was to gess No I tell in Now town borne o on the water I says you beat me and so wee Lafed and it shuk of the spleane shoue him A Crows Neast he can carve one A fine fellow --- I shold had all marbel if any bodey could to me the prise so I have sent for 8 busts for kings and grat men and 1 Lion & 2 gray hounds I hope to hear in foue Days to all onnest men.†

†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† TIMOTHY DEXTER

 

 

Lord Dexterís Dissertation on Man.

mister printter I must gou sum fouder I have got one good pen my fortin has bin hard very hard that is I have had hard Noks on my head 4 difrent times from A boy to this Day twice taken up for dead two beatings was a Lawyer then he put me blind 7 days 2 tockters he was mad be Case the peopel at large Declared me Lord Dexter king of Chester this at my Contrey seet 26 mils from N Port my plase there is the fist from solt water to Canedy --- this Lawyer that broused me was Judg Livemore son Arther the same Creator borid 200 dolors some monts be fore this & then Oaded me he beat his bene factter it has bin my Luck to be yoused ten times wos by them I doue the most for I have Lost first and Last as much as a tun of silver grose my wife that was had 400 wut of silver Abraham bishup that maried my dafter ten years gone him & shee sence then & my son Samuel L Dexter upwards seventeene thousands Dolors the Rest by hamsher Col by Rougs has gokbey handed preasts Deakens gruntters whimers Every foue minnets A sith or A groune I thinks sum times the saving solt & smoak & solt peater will in time be very dear if it is yous the more smoak or the preasts will be out of work Littel like sister france I lade out A blan to have holerdays one Day in ten 24 years gone I thort it would save the Natision great deale of money sir in one sentrey then the prests wood have time to studdery then hammer down smartly make the sulffer smoak their Nostel under the Cloak of pie eatty the hipecricks Cloven foots thay Doue it to git power to Lie and Not be mistrusted all wars mostly by the suf the broken marchents are fond of war for they hant Nothing to Lous and the minesters in all wars the Case of god Leave the Divel out when it all Divel If you can bare the trouth I will tell the trouth man is the best Annemal and the worst all men are more or Less the Divel but there is sit of ods sum halfe sum three quarters the other part of beast of Difrent kind of beasts sum one thing and sum a Nother sum Like a dog sum Lik horses sum bare s Cat sum Lion sum lik ouls sum a monkey sum wild Cat sum Lam sum A Dove sum a hogg sum a oxe sum a snake I want Desepons to be Dun A way but they wont Never be as Long as prist Riden what Doue the preast preach to the Divel for all there hearaes old and youn more or Less the Divel I Liked to sade so Divel preaches to Divels Rebouking sin keep it up up sayeth the hipacrits mockers of god habits an Costom is the ods ods make the diffrence I sees god in all plases the god of Nater in all things wee Live and move in god he is the god of Nateer all Nater is god take one Ellement from us one of the fore take the fier or the water or or Eare or Earth wee are gone so wee Live in god Now Less us all be good children doue all things Rite the strong must bear the Infremiteys of the wicked shildren keep tite laws Draw the Ranes Littel harder stop-theavs as fast as you can bad trade sheuuing Nine Numbers was Rot in 23 owers when I had hold of the pen five houres & 35 minnits A sort ment A sort ment is good in A shop ---

 


the preasts fixes there goods six days when the open shop on sundays to sell there goods sum sets them of better than others bolerhed when man is so week he wont doue for a Lawer make a preast of him for week thing to go with week things the blind to Lead the blind so that they may fall into one Dich and so they goue throue the world darkiness but foue peopel have A pinion of there one Not one in twenty as to this world goods and so it is as to the other world to Inquire the way goue to a fryer our peopel A bout the same only call it sumthing Else in Rum18 of a king call it presedent but preasts have money to save sols I want to know what a sole is I wish to see one Not a gizard I thinks the sole is the thinking part there is grat minds & Littel minds grat sols and Littel sols great minns and littel minds According to hevdey boddeys that has the power of our boddeys the same mother and the same father and six children how thay will differ in Looks complexions and axons sum for grat thing sum for littel thing sumthing Nouw I say I say my figers will pay Intress money prove it first going over my brige sum more tole then helping the markett of the town Leeting hoses tavern keepers costom the honnor of the town & my selfe19

TIMOTHY DEXTER.

 

 

one thing fourder I have bin convarted upwards 30 years quite Ressned for the day the grat day I wish the preast Node as much as I think I doue there hearts would Leap up to glory to be so Reader for the time of regoicing to goue to be maried to what a fine widow with her Lamp bourning the Lamps trimmed with glorey the shaking quickers after thay git convarted and thare sins washed A way they stay at home & Let thouse go unclene and so it is much so with me I stay at home praying for theavs and Rougs to be saved Day and Night praying for siners poour creaters my hous keeper is in the dark wos then bad Crasey to be saved shee says shee has sind A gainst the holey gost I have Asked her what is shee says it is sumthing but cant find out way sends for the preast coms what is the mater gost gost Dear sir & the minester makes a prayer the gost went of mostly not all part strayed behind shee has bean crasey Ever sence the preast cant Lay the serpont houe many Nick Names three things have so sayeth the preacher Amen Amen see fath I du

 

Lord Dexter against Colleges and Priests.

Noue mister printer sir I was at Noue haven 7 years and seven monts past at commencement Degress on 40 boys was tuck degrees to doue good or Not good the old man with the hat20 told them to sueday houeman Nater walk as A band of brothers from that time to this day I thort that all thous that was brot up to Coleage the meaning was to git there Living out of the Labeer If the Coleages was to continer one sentry and keep up the game reken the cost of all from there cradel to 22 years old all there fathers and gurdEands to Lay out one houndred years intress upon intress gess at it & cast it see houe many houndred thousand millions of Dolors it would com to to make Rougs and thieves to plunder the Labering man that sweats to get his bread good common Laning is the be t sum good books is best well under stoud be onnest dont be preast Riden it is a cheat all be onnest in all things Now feare Let this goue as you find it my way speling houe is the strangest man

T DEXTER



fourder mister printer for a minister to git the tone is a grat pint when I lived in hamsher one Noue Lit babstis babler sobed A way just fineshing his sermon he says o good lord I hop you will consider foue hints I have given and I will cleare it up sum time hence I am much worn down Now the wether being very worme to day Less bray & so went on fire fire & brimstone & grunting & sithing and tryed to cry & snufel & blow the sconks horne and sum the old fouls & young fouls so to crying I tuck my hat and went out houe mankind and woman kind is in posed upon all over the world more or less hy preast craf o for shame o for shame I pittey them be onnest doue as you would wish others to doue unto you in all things Now fear of Death A men

T. Dír


Fourder what diffrent wous we have of this world & the other world two good women Liven in a town whare I once lived one was sick of consumsion Near Death both belonged to the Church very onnest only the well woman was weak in wous & thing says unto the sik woman I thinks you will see my housbon doue tell him I and my son A greus very well and wee are all well and the sow is piged and got seaven pritty pigs and fare you well sister this I belieave is serting troue & so fare the well --- I shall com A gane in Littel while

 

 

QUIXOTANA: Lord Dexterís Pugilism --- Rencontre with a Lawyer --- the Peer suffers ignominious defeat.

THIS COMETH GREETING. mister printers the Igrent or the Nowing wons says I ort to Doue as thay Doue to keep up Cheats or the same thing Desephons to Deseave the Igrent so wee may Cheat and Likewise have wars and plunder my wish is all Liers may have there part of fier and brimstone in this world or least sum part part of it or Else the gouement is Not good it will want pourging soone if a Lawyer is to way Lay a man an brouse him unmassely All most to Death A sitteson that pays twentey fore Dolors for Careags and more than one Dolor A week to ment the hiways and my being Libperel is in part of this bloddey Afare No sauage would beat a man as I was beaten almost to Death I Did not know houe these men Came to keep sade Lawyer from quite kiling of me till sum time After three men saw the Axon of the blodey seene without massay and carried sade Dexter in to the house sun fainting or Neare to it se and behold the olful site bleading and blind of one Eye twoue brousings in two hours at Least Now Laws in this part of the world Now part of the world A man of money to Live those I lend money to sind A Lawyer and others thay youse me the wost it maks Inemye then those Rogs if there is Any that call me A foull and pick A Qualrel with me A bout my Nous papers so as to pay the Lawyer Craft to make up the molton Calf Not an Ox Now the town of Chester has Lost two hundred wate of silver at Least I beleuv more money Now thay may have me in the town or a Lawyer Chouse for yourselves my frinds and felow mortals pease be with you All A men selagh finely brethren sum thing more Coming ---

TIMOTHY DEXTER

      Chester Sept the 29 1796



Lord Dexter discourses very learnedly on Bridges; arrives to the conclusion that Newburyport will double its population in thirty years, and ends with a splendid donation to the town to be remembered in his will.

I say to houme in may consarne Now to our Rulers for a hearing in the first plase Dexter and others consarned in the first brigge on the merremak it has payed to the town of N Port and Cuntry at large twenty per sent, one thirde to each party, the owners one third of twenty per sent. This is worrey of prase sense this brigge was finished two more briges has been done over A bove on the same River. the Rocks brige is a wast of money and Laber if there was no Rocks brigg the havrel brigg would barly pay the undertakers in bilding sade brigg Now no onnest men can burne at the hart with grudging the proffets of any one of those brigges. The Rocks brigg is most dun the money is Lost havvrel barly pays the way when the Rocks brigg is Dun and Now more Dexters brigg and others oners doue but have half so much Intrest as bankers the Repars & & & so on has bin grate to finish the Repars back and fored to next ougest is five thousand dolars in nine or ten years or there A bouts and you all know how money has been sum part of the time very bad in worth

 

the town of N Port is likely to grow in thirty years to Doubel be twelve thousand peopel three thousand A bove this brigg talked of21


No 2 further please your honours there is A bout Eight hundred Rodd in lenth to the Deare Oilen brigg & one hundred Rodd in weth to bring it square Nobel house Lotts Number of bilding yards up to the Deare Oilen Brigg and many plases for warfes Nater has formed N Port and part of Noubry as well for pease and war all together as well as the Lord would wish to have it and now lett us be wise in proving in proving it n pease and godly love Not gruging one Another if sixtey three oners was now as at first in Dear Oilen brigg this hart burning wodent be sot on fier Now but twenty five oners such and such passons feels hurt pretending there is toue much profets to Dexter in petickler he has twelve per sent grate mestake they chouse to Lye to hurt me becose it is the most of my bread the best Anker to my ship I have bought at fifty pounds A share in twelve monts past, people has offen asked me why I did not bye the holl I have offen told them mankind was mankind it wod not dou nor wod it dou for a foue people to hold all the public seccoureteys for mankind was so much of what wee Call the Devel or Rouring Lions or wouls



No 3 fouder there is plenty of Complant of the diffulty of pasing those briges Now as it is troue if those giddy people have Liberty to bould A brigg it wont pay but three or four per sent at most then they must have one halfe the passing of my brigg as I call it A mad bisness Now as for A turn pik from Newbrey brige to Epsswith is not bad it may be doue middling well six one way half a Dozen tother way & from Epsswith to beble and so on to Boston Amen or from Dexters brige to moulden brigg or Reather to Noue boston brigg it may have its wate as much as Ever wee ant Ripe for so many grate things wate seven years Longer time


I say wate twelve years before you have Any more briges within four miles of meremack brigg I have it in contemplasion to give twenty five share to the town of N Port to be kept at there expence in Repars the Incom for mending streets in the town of N Port for that sole yous to be fixed in my last will --- well Dun I meane this After 12 years for the town of N Port to have twenty five shars from march first day one thousand Eigh hundred and two to be in foull forse and power greeting I ones one hundred ten shars there is two hundred in the holl the first Cost and Repars is A bout forty thousand and seven hundred Dollars.22

I am a frind to all onnest men††

TIMOTHY DEXTER

 

 

 

Translated Text

Lord Dexter depicts the evil results of making Two Towns of One; advises against Office-Seeking and College-Learning.

Friends, hear me. Two (2) grenadiers (et al) go up in 20 days. Further, friends, I will tell the type of mankind, what is that 35 or 36 years gone (by, about) a town called Newbury, all one (in) the United States.15 Newbury people kept together quietly until the learned grew strong. The farmers were (proportionally) 12 out of the 20 (of the population). They wanted to have the officers in the country (and) the learned in the seaport wanted to have them there. Jeering arose, and things grew warm. Fight they would, in law: They went the General Court to be set off and finally, they got their ends answered. The seaport called Newburyport is 600 acres of land out of thirty thousand acres of good land. So much for mad people of learning! (It) makes them mad. If they had kept together they would have been the second town in this state, about half of Boston (in stature). Now men mad to be in office hurt the people at large, like carrying the innocent lamb to slaughter. Now would it do to (likewise) divide the North from the South? (It should remain) all one. What I am leading to: now keep together (for) it is like man and wife in true love, until death. In the grander, you will seize the Glory. I say, keep together, don't break the chain. Renew brotherly love. Never fade like my box in my garden. Be one great family. Give way to one another. Those changes are the tides, high water & low water, high tides & low tides. For my part, I have liked all the kings, all three. All our broken merchants can't have the beasts of profit go and till the ground, go to work. (This) is (the practice for) all that has been to college, go with slippers and promise to pay and never pay, only with a lie. I guess 4/5 (of the population) is college-learnt or Devil-learnt or pretend to be honest freemasons but are to the country (forgive me for guessing, I hope it is not so): The learned are for loaves & little fishes. Moses was but a man and (so is) Aaron (Burr). (As men) they had some Devil. Like myself (for every) man is the same (when you) give him power. I say, the cloak cucullated masters16 (are) the worst of cheats. We haven't got any Newburyport: We are noted to be the first in the North (for worship on) Sabbath Day (but) that is not half enough (for some). (So many) night meetings! It makes work for the Doctors and nurses (with everyone) catching cold. But those that live breed fast to make up for those who die. Poor creatures. I pity them, so priest-ridden It is wicked to leave poor souls into the grave. All our ministers are imported. I admit, (they are) very good men, full of pious love, I (would) keep them.


Magnanimity of Lord Dexter.

The young man that does almost all my carving, his work is much liked by our great men. I felt funny one day (so) I thought I would ask said young man where he was borne. He said, "No where." What is all that? "No where, was your mother over shaded?"17 I says, "My mother was, if I was to guess." "No, I tell, in no town (for I was) born on the water!" I said, "You beat me!" And so we laughed and it shook (of) the spleen. I showed him a crow's nest (to see if) he can carve one. A fine fellow --- I should (have) had (the figures) all (carved in) marble if anybody could (quote) to me the price. So I have sent for 8 busts for kings and great men and 1 Lion & 2 gray hounds, I hope to hear (back) in a few days --- to all honest men.†

†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† TIMOTHY DEXTER

 

Lord Dexterís Dissertation on Man.

Mister Printer: I must go some further. (I have got one good pen.) My fortune has been hard, very hard. That is, I have had hard knocks on my head, 4 different times, from a boy to this day. (Twice taken up for dead (with two beatings). (It) was a Lawyer then. He put me blind for 7 days, (needing) 2 doctors. He was mad because the people at large declared me Lord Dexter, king of Chester. (This, at my country seat 26 miles from Newburyport. My place there is the first from salt water to Canada) --- This Lawyer that bruised me was Judge (Samuel) Livermore's son Arthur --- the same creature (who had) borrowed 200 dollars some months before this & then owed me. He beat his benefactor! It has been my luck to be used ten times worse by them I do the most for. I have lost first and last as much as a ton of silver gross. My wife that was had 400 weight of silver. Abraham Bishop (who) married my daughter ten years gone (by, ago) --- him & she since then & my son Samuel L. Dexter upwards (to) seventeen thousand dollars. The rest by (New) Hampshire by rouges has Jacobin-handed priests, deacons, grunters and whiners (who) every few minutes (give) a sigh or a groan. I think sometimes the saving (of) salt & smoke & saltpeter will in time be very dear, if it is used (for) more smoke (as incense). Or the priests will be out of work --- a little like sister France! I laid out a plan to have holidays one day in ten 24 years gone by (ago). I thought it would save the nation a great deal of money, Sir. In one century then the priests would have time to study then hammer down smartly, make the sulfur smoke in their nostril under the cloak of piety. The hypocrite, cloven-foot! They do it to get power, to lie and not be mistrusted. All wars (mostly) be the stuff (of) the broken merchants (who) are fond of war for they have nothing to lose. And the ministers (say) in all wars (it is) the cause of God. Leave the Devil out, when it (war) is all the Devil! If you can bear the truth, I will tell the truth. Man is the best animal and the worst. All men are more or less the Devil but there is a sight of odds: Some (are) half, some (are) three-quarters, the other part of beast. Of different kinds of beasts: Some one thing and some another. Some like a dog, some like horses. Some bears, cats, some lions, some like owls, some a monkey, some wildcat, some lambs, some a dove, some a hog, some an ox, some a snake. I want deceptions to be done away, but they won't ever be as long as priest-ridden do what the priest preach to the Devil. For all their hearers, old and young, more or less, (are) the Devil. I liked to say so: the Devil preaches to Devils, rebuking sin. Keep it up, up sayeth the hypocrite, mockers of good habits. And custom is the odds, odds make the difference. I see God in all places: the God of Nature in all things. We live and move in God. He is the God of Nature, all Nature is God. Take one element from us, one of the four --- take the fire or the water or air or earth, we are gone. So we live in God --- Now let us us all be good children, do all things right. The strong must bear the infirmities of the wicked children. Keep tight laws. Draw the reins a little harder, stop thieves as fast as you can. Bad trade showing nine numbers wrote in 23 hours when I had hold of the pen five hours & 35 minutes. Assortment, assortment is good in a shop ---

The priests fix their goods six days, when (they) open the shop on Sundays to sell their goods. Some set them off better than others bother. When man is so weak he won't do for a lawyer, make a priest of him, for (a) weak thing to go with weak things. The blind to lead the blind, so that they may fall into one ditch, and so they go through the world in darkness. But few people have (such) opinion of their one (clergyperson). Not one in twenty has this worldly goods, and so it is as to the other world. To inquire the way go to a Friar, our people (are) about the same only call it something else. (In room18 of a king, call it president.) But priests have money to save souls (so) I want to know what a soul is. I wish to see one (not a gizzard). I think the soul is the thinking part. There are great minds & little minds, great souls and little souls, great minds and little minds, according to the heavenly bodies that have the power over our bodies. The same mother and the same father and six children, how they will differ in looks, complexion and actions. Some (destined) for great things, some for little things, something. Now I say I say my figures will pay interest money: Prove it first (by) going over my bridge (for) some more tolls, thus helping the market of the town, letting houses, tavern keepers, custom (taxes), the honor of the town & myself.19

TIMOTHY DEXTER.

 

One thing further, I have been converted upwards to 30 years, quite resigned for the day, the great day. I wish the priests knew as much as I think I do. Their hearts would leap up to glory to be so ready for the time of rejoicing. To go to be married to what a fine widow with her lamp burning. The lamps trimmed with Glory! The shaking Quakers, after they get converted and their sins washed away, they stay at home & let those go unclean and so it is much so with me. I stay at home praying for thieves and rouges to be saved, day and night praying for sinners, poor creatures. My housekeeper is in the dark, worse then bad, crazy to be saved. She says she has sinned against the Holy Ghost. I have asked her what is (it) and she says it is something, but can't find out (the) way. Sends for the priest (who) comes (and says), "What is the matter?" "Ghost, ghost, dear Sir" & the minister makes a prayer (and) the ghost went off mostly (not all). Part stayed behind. She has been crazy ever since. The priest can't lay the serpent: How many nicknames? Three things (they) have, so sayeth the preacher. Amen, Amen. See faith. I do.

 

Lord Dexter against Colleges and Priests.

Now Mister Printer sir: I was at New Haven 7 years and seven months past at a commencement (college) degrees on 40 boys, who took degrees to do good (or not good). The old man with the hat20 told them to study human nature, walk as a band of brothers from that time to this day. I thought that all those that was brought up to college, the meaning was to get their living out of the laborer. If the colleges were to continue one century and keep up the game, reckon the cost of all from their cradle to 22 years old, all their fathers and guardians to lay out one hundred years interest upon interest --- guess at it & cast it. See how many hundred thousand millions of dollars it would come to make rouges and thieves to plunder the laboring man that sweats to get his bread. Good common learning is the best, some good books is best, well understood. Be honest, don't be priest-ridden: it is a cheat. All be honest in all things, no fear. Let this go, as you find it. My way (of) spelling how is the strangest, man.

T DEXTER


Further, Mister Printer, for a minister to get the tone is a great point. When I lived in (New) Hampshire, one New Light Baptist babbler sobbed away just finishing his sermon. He says, O Good Lord, I hope you will consider (a) few hints I have given and I will clear it up some time, hence I am much worn down. Now the weather being very warm today, let's pray & so went on fire, fire & brimstone & grunting & sighing and tried to cry & snuffle & blow the conch horn and some (of) the old fools & young fools so too (were) crying. I took my hat and went out. How mankind and womankind is imposed upon all over the world more or less by priest craft. O for shame! O for shame! I pity them! Be honest, do as you would wish others to do unto you in all things. No fear of Death. Amen.

T. Dír

Further, what different woes we have of this world & the other world. Two good women living in a town where I once lived, one was sick of consumption (and) near death. Both belonged to the Church, very honest. Only the well woman was weak in woes & thing says unto the sick woman: "I think you (soon) will see my husband (and) do tell him I and my son agree very well and we are all well and the sow is pigged and got seven pretty pigs and fare you well sister. This I believe is certainly true & so fare thee well --- I shall come again in a little while.

 

 

QUIXOTANA: Lord Dexterís Pugilism --- Rencontre with a Lawyer --- the Peer suffers ignominious defeat.

THIS COMETH GREETING. Mister printers, the Ignorant or the Knowing Ones says I ought to do as they do to keep up cheats or the same thing, deceptions. To deceive the ignorant so we may cheat and likewise have wars and plunder. My wish is all liars may have their part of fire and brimstone in this world (or least some part of it) or else the government is not good (and) it will want purging soon. If a lawyer is to way lay a man and bruise him unmercifully almost to death: A citizen that pays twenty-four dollars for carriages and more than one dollar a week to mend the highways --- and my being liberal is in part of this bloody affair. No savage would beat a man as I was beaten almost to death. I did not know how these men came to keep said lawyer from quite killing of me (until some time after). Three men saw the action of the bloody scene without mercy and carried said Dexter into the house. (My) son fainting or near to it see and behold the awful sight, bleeding and blind of one eye, two bruisings in two hours, at least. No laws in this part of the world, (this is) no part of the world (for) a man of money to live. Those I lend money to sinned. A lawyer and others, they used me the worst, it makes enemy. Then those rouges, if there is any that call me a fool and pick a quarrel with me about my newspapers so as to pay the lawyer craft to make up the molten calf not an ox. Now the town of Chester has lost two hundred weight of silver, at least. (I believe more money.) Now they may have me in the town or a lawyer: choose for yourselves, my friends and fellow mortals. Peace be with you all. Amen. Selah, finely, brethren. Something more coming ---

TIMOTHY DEXTER

      Chester Sept the 29 1796

 

Lord Dexter discourses very learnedly on Bridges; arrives to the conclusion that Newburyport will double its population in thirty years, and ends with a splendid donation to the town to be remembered in his will.

I say to whom in may concern: Now to our rulers for a hearing in the first place, Dexter and others concerned in the first bridge on the Merrimack. It has paid to the town of Newburyport and country at large twenty percent, one third to each party, the owners one third of twenty percent. This is worthy of praise. Since this bridge was finished, two more bridges have been done over above on the same river: the Rocks bridge is a waste of money and labor. If there were no Rocks bridge, the Haverhill bridge would barely pay the undertakers in building said bridge. Now no honest men can burn at the heart with grudging the profits of any one of those bridges. The Rocks bridge is almost done. The money is lost (and) Haverhill barely pays the way when the Rocks bridge is done. And now more: Dexter's bridge and other's owners do but have half so much interest as (the) bankers. The repairs et cetera and so on has been great. To finish the repairs back and forward to next August is five thousand dollars in nine or ten years or thereabouts and you all know how money has been, some part of the time very bad in worth.

The town of Newburyport is likely to grow in thirty years to double becoming twelve thousand people, with three thousand above this bridge talked of.21

No 2: Further please, Your Honors: There is about eight hundred rod in length to the Deer Island bridge & one hundred rod in width to bring it square. Noble house lots, with a number of building yards up to the Deer Island bridge and many places for wharfs. Nature has formed Newburyport and part of Newbury as well for peace and war, all together as well as the Lord would wish to have it and now let us be wise improving (and) in proving it in peace and Godly love --- not grudging one another. If sixty-three owners were now as at first in Deer Island bridge this heart burning wouldn't be set on fire now but twenty five owners such and such passions, feel hurt, pretending there is too much profits to Dexter in particular. He has twelve percent, great mistake. They choose to lie to hurt me because it is the most of my bread. The best anchor to my ship. I have bought at fifty pounds a share in twelve months past. People have often asked me why I did not buy the whole. I have often told them mankind was mankind: It would not do nor would it do for a few people to hold all the public securities for mankind was so much of what we call the Devil or roaring lions or wolves.


No. 3, further, there is plenty of complaint of the difficulty of passing (on) those bridges. Now as it is true if those giddy people have liberty to build a bridge, it won't pay but three or four percent at most, then they must have one-half the passing of my bridge as I call it. A mad business! Now as for a turnpike from Newbury bridge to Ipswich, (it) is not bad, it may be do middling well: Six one way, half a Dozen the other way & from Ipswich to Beverly and so on to Boston. Amen. Or from Dexter's bridge to Malden bridge or rather to a new Boston bridge, it may have its wait as much as ever. We aren't ripe for so many great things. Wait seven years longer time.

I say wait twelve years before you have anymore bridges within four miles of Merrimack bridge. I have it in contemplation to give twenty five shares to the town of Newburyport to be kept at their expense in repairs. The income (derived would be) for mending streets in the town of Newburyport for that sole use to be fixed in my last will. Well done --- I mean this. After 12 years, for the town of Newburyport to have twenty five shares (from the first day of March), one thousand eight hundred and two, to be in full force and power. Greeting, I want one hundred ten shares, (there is two hundred in the whole); the first (for) cost and repairs is about forty thousand and seven hundred dollars.22

I am a friend to all honest men††

TIMOTHY DEXTER

 

 

 

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